Mount Sinai School of Medicine

The Emergency Medicine Residency at The Mount Sinai Hospital is an extraordinary, well-balanced clinical training that offers a complete training program for tomorrow’s leaders in Emergency Medicine.

Through training at both of Mount Sinai's complementary, high-volume clinical sites our residents graduate prepared to work anywhere. We offer rich opportunities in all areas of Emergency Medicine, along with generous elective time and mentoring from our dedicated faculty, allowing residents to participate in cutting-edge projects.

Our Senior Specialty Tracks, or "mini-fellowships," allow you to develop extra skills and knowledge in an area of interest, setting the foundation for a multidimensional career.

As a result, our graduates consistently obtain sought-after academic, private, and fellowship positions wherever they choose to go after training, including the nation's tightest job markets.

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Beyond ATLS: What the Manual Doesn't Tell You All these factors coalesce in the trauma bay to create a downward spiral of shock where life-saving interventions wrestle with each other as the patient
ECG Challenge Case. A 79-year-old male with a medical history of “some heart problems” presents to the emergency department with 3 days of fatigue and shortness of breath. This ECG is obtained in tri
ECG Challenge Case. A 59-year-old male smoker with a history of hypertension, familial hyperlipidemia and insulin dependent diabetes presents with 2 hours of substernal chest pressure radiating to hi
ECG Challenge Case. A 75-year-old male with a history of systolic congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presents with shortness o
Ahead of the Curve: Assessment of Fluid Responsiveness in the ED A 70-year-old male with a history of atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure presents to the emergency department (ED) hypote
ECG Challenge Case A 76-year-old female with dementia and unknown cardiac history presents with chest pain and palpitations for 4 hours. Answer Atrial fibrillation preceded and followed by paced beat
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Treating the Convicted Residents in the receiving hospital for one of the world's largest correctional facilities see a wide variety of incarcerated patients with an array of chief complaints. The CD
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Collecting Better Data for Better Care As new interns embark on the path towards becoming EM physicians, many may be surprised (and sometimes frustrated) to realize the sheer volume of patients who m
The NNT: Reclaiming the Negative Space Taking into account the negative space, we have a more complete picture of the positive and negative effects of treatment and can make more informed decisions w