Mount Sinai School of Medicine

The Emergency Medicine Residency at The Mount Sinai Hospital is an extraordinary, well-balanced clinical training that offers a complete training program for tomorrow’s leaders in Emergency Medicine.

Through training at both of Mount Sinai's complementary, high-volume clinical sites our residents graduate prepared to work anywhere. We offer rich opportunities in all areas of Emergency Medicine, along with generous elective time and mentoring from our dedicated faculty, allowing residents to participate in cutting-edge projects.

Our Senior Specialty Tracks, or "mini-fellowships," allow you to develop extra skills and knowledge in an area of interest, setting the foundation for a multidimensional career.

As a result, our graduates consistently obtain sought-after academic, private, and fellowship positions wherever they choose to go after training, including the nation's tightest job markets.

Fluid resuscitation guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock presently address only the initial phase of resuscitation. The RIFTS trial examines the efficacy of a restrictive IV fluid resuscitati
Does early neuromuscular blockade accompanied by heavy sedation in ARDS cases improve all-cause in-hospital mortality rates? The ROSE trial investigates.
When trying to resuscitate patients with septic shock, which offers better guidance for intervention: measuring capillary refill or trending lactate levels? The Andromeda SHOCK trial studied patients
Critically ill pediatric patients can make physicians-in-training nervous - and that anxiety is heightened when it comes to a pediatric patient in respiratory distress. This article reviews the basics
Hemodialysis is the definitive modality of lithium clearance in severe toxicity. In early overdose, however, whole bowel irrigation may prevent lithium absorption and subsequent toxicity if mental sta
The study authors sought to examine the effect of closed chest compressions on cardiac arrest due to hemorrhagic shock versus whole blood resuscitation.
Surviving Sepsis Guidelines recommend crystalloids for initial fluid resuscitation then switching to albumin when crystalloids are insufficient. There is debate regarding using colloid as an initial r